Journal cover Journal topic
Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
NHESS cover
Executive editors: 
Stefano
Tinti
,
 Heidi Kreibich, Bruce D. Malamud & Uwe Ulbrich

Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (NHESS) is an interdisciplinary and international journal dedicated to the public discussion and open-access publication of high-quality studies and original research on natural hazards and their consequences. Embracing a holistic Earth system science approach, NHESS serves a wide and diverse community of research scientists, practitioners, and decision makers concerned with detection of natural hazards, monitoring and modelling, vulnerability and risk assessment, and the design and implementation of mitigation and adaptation strategies, including economical, societal, and educational aspects.

News

Press Release: New study reveals where MH370 debris more likely to be found

27 Jul 2016

A team of researchers in Italy has used the location of confirmed debris from MH370 to determine where the airliner might have crashed, and where further debris could be found.

Transparent post-discussion review

23 May 2016

NHESS will introduce transparent post-discussion review on 1 June 2016: all reports, the authors' response and the different manuscript versions will be published if the paper is accepted.

Institutional agreement for NHESS authors affiliated with the Leibniz Universität Hannover

11 Jan 2016

Copernicus Publications and the Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB) in Hanover, Germany have signed an agreement on central billing of article processing charges.

Recent articles


Highlight articles

In March 2014, a commercial airliner vanished without a trace. The wreckage of the plane was never recovered, except for a small part of the wing that washed up 17 months after the disappearance. In this paper we show a method to model the most likely trajectories of floating debris from the aircraft. The results show that the location of the recovered aircraft part is compatible with the assumed crash site and predict that further debris may be found along the African east coast.

Eric Jansen, Giovanni Coppini, and Nadia Pinardi

Here, we aim to better understand the potential for using video games in volcanic hazard education with at-risk communities. A study using a bespoke-designed video game - St. Vincent's Volcano - was trialled on the Caribbean island of St. Vincent in 2015. Preliminary data analysis demonstrates 94% of study participants had an improved knowledge of volcanic hazards after playing the game, leading us to conclude that video games could be a logical progression for education and outreach activities.

L. Mani, P. D. Cole, and I. Stewart

Inundations on the Black Sea coast of the Krasnodar territory of the Russian Federation were analysed for 1945 to 2013. Risks, hazards and damage from inundations here are some of the highest in the country. The large quantity and the extremeness of rainfall, and the intense flood regimes of the rivers are the main contributors. Additionally, anthropogenic impact such as badly planned economic activities in channels, floodplains and on river watersheds strongly enhance the effects.

N. Alexeevsky, D. V. Magritsky, K. P. Koltermann, I. Krylenko, and P. Toropov

Many urban areas experience both fluvial and pluvial floods, thus this study aims to analyse fluvial and pluvial flood hazards as well as combined pluvial and fluvial flood hazards. This combined fluvial-pluvial flood hazard analysis is performed in a tropical environment for Can Tho city in the Mekong Delta. The final results are probabilistic hazard maps, showing the maximum inundation caused by floods of different magnitudes along with an uncertainty estimation.

H. Apel, O. Martínez Trepat, N. N. Hung, D. T. Chinh, B. Merz, and N. V. Dung

We proposed an Rmax estimation method based on the radius of the 50 knot wind (R50). The data obtained during the passage of strong typhoons by a meteorological station network in the Japanese archipelago enabled us to derive the following simple formula, Rmax = 0.23 R50. The proposed method is expected to increase the reliability of storm surge prediction and contribute to disaster risk management, particularly in the western North Pacific.

H. Takagi and W. Wu

Publications Copernicus